SHARE

Assemblyman Travis Allen, a Republican candidate for governor, announced Friday that hes collected more than 35,000 signatures from people across California who want their communities to “opt out” of the states sanctuary law.

Allen plans to forward those signatures to elected leaders in the 300 cities they came from, hoping to build on a new anti-sanctuary movement.

  • Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen meets with people as he announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • People wave and shout at traffic on PCH as Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • SoundThe gallery will resume inseconds
  • Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen, right, and Huntington Beach Mayor Mike Posey speak as Allen announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Huntington Beach City Attorney Michael Gates, left, talks about the lawsuit filed by the city against California, alleging a new state law – the California Values Act – violates the California Constitution. Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen announces the receipt of more than 35,000 signatures he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law. Allen held a press conference at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen, center, announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Huntington Beach Mayor Mike Posey listens as Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen, center, announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Huntington Beach City Attorney Michael Gates talks about how the citys lawsuit differs from the federal lawsuit against Californias sanctuary laws during a press conference called by Assemblyman Travis Allen at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Martha Mac of Huntington Beach cheers for Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen while he announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Austin Edsell and Eva Weisz of Huntington Beach attend a rally in which Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Attending the rally, a woman who goes by Crystal Jade listens as Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Your ads will be inserted here by

    Easy Plugin for AdSense.

    Please go to the plugin admin page to
    Paste your ad code OR
    Suppress this ad slot.

    Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen signs the back of a supporters shirt as he announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen has photos taken with supporters as he announces the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he has received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Gubernatorial candidate and Assemblyman Travis Allen is surrounded by a small group of supporters as he is interviewed after he announced the receipt of more than 35,000 petitions he received from across the state encouraging local elected officials to opt out of Californias sanctuary-state law while speaking at the Huntington Beach pier Friday, April 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

Show Caption of Expand

At a press conference next to the Huntington Beach pier, Allen was surrounded by a handful of local politicians from Huntington Beach, Los Alamitos and Fountain Valley — three of the cities that have recently taken steps against California laws to protect people in the country illegally.

“It is a right to keep California safe and thats what were going to do,” Allen told a crowd of about 60.

The sanctuary law, SB-54, limits cooperation between local and state agencies and ICE, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, regarding information and transfers of unauthorized immigrants upon their release from jail. The law, however, does not prohibit agencies from working together in many cases. Police can continue sharing the release dates of inmates if they have been convicted of one of about 800 offenses outlined in another state law called the California Trust Act.

Many have misinterpreted the law, including Allen, who wrote in a news release this week that the law “prohibits local jurisdictions from cooperating” with ICE.

Those gathered Friday to support their hometown gubernatorial candidate echoed some of Allens slogans, which are similar to Trumps.

“Were taking our state back,” Allen told them.

The lawsuit filed by the U.S. Justice Department lawsuit challenges Californias sanctuary policies as obstructing federal immigration law and violating the Constitutions supremacy clause.

California Sen. Kevin de De León, who wrote SB-54, argues that it does not violate the Constitution. California is not required to divert state resources to enforce federal immigration laws and the new law looks to ensure that, he reiterated during a press conference in San Diego on Wednesday.

The other two laws targeted in the federal lawsuit are the Workplace Raid law, which can fine business owners for cooperating with immigration agents, and the Detention Review law, which allows California to inspect federal facilities in the state used for immigration detentions.

[contf] [contfnew]

daily news

[contfnewc] [contfnewc]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here