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Is there a more charmed movie in theaters right now than Crazy Rich Asians? The groundbreaking rom-com, directed by Jon M. Chu, has introduced moviegoers to marquee-worthy newbies like Henry Golding (a charismatic, square-jawed blessing)—and earned a robust $26 million in its opening weekend. Now, the rom-com is proving just how badly audiences have been craving films of its ilk by picking up another $25 million in its second week at the box office. Thats only a 6 percent drop in sales from the films first weekend to the second—which is fairly unprecedented; most releases, as the New York Times notes, drop somewhere between 30 and 60 percent in that time frame.

“Wow… Just wow,” Golding tweeted in response to the news. “Thankyou to all who keep turning up and telling their friends they have to go watch our little movie. This is so strong ❤.”

Crazy Rich Asians is also the top-grossing comedy of the year so far, with its worldwide gross rolling in around $83 million. It beat out the stealthily successful Game Night, which starred Rachel McAdams and Jason Bateman. And Crazy Rich Asians has plenty of room to grow, too: the blockbuster has only picked up about $7.1 million overseas so far, prior to opening wide around the world.

The film does not yet have a set release date set in China, the globes second biggest moviegoing market. Its facing a few obstacles there, including Chinas limiting foreign film quota—but the films producers remain hopeful.

“Were all praying to the China gods right now," producer John Penotti previously told the Hollywood Reporter. “From my colleagues in Beijing, it looks like we're in strong consideration.”

Regardless, Crazy Rich Asians has performed well enough that Warner Bros. is moving forward with a sequel, China Rich Girlfriend. The studio plans to bring back Chu to direct, the first films producers to produce, and the same actors to act—after theyve negotiated crazy rich sequel deals, of course. The second movie will be an adaptation of Kevin Kwans eponymous Crazy Rich Asians follow-up novel, revolving around the same opulent crew as they branch out from Singapore and into the even crazier, old-moneyed wonderland of mainland China.

Get Vanity Fairs HWD NewsletterSign up for essential industry and award news from Hollywood.Full ScreenPhotos:13 Old Hollywood Hot Spots That Defined an Era

The Mocambo

The pivotal West Hollywood nightclub, which regularly hosted artists like Dorothy Dandridge and Eartha Kitt, served as the debut spot for two singular performers: Frank Sinatra, who was making his Los Angeles debut as a solo act, and Ella Fitzgerald, who only got a slot thanks to a bit of lobbying from Marilyn Monroe. “She personally called the owner of the Mocambo and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night,” Fitzgerald once said. “The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard. After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again.”Photo: From left, by J. R. Eyerman, by Ralph Crane, both from The LIFE Images Collection; By William Gottlieb/Redferns.The Brown Derby

The Brown Derby

Clark Gable proposed to Carole Lombard at the Vine St. location of this much-loved restaurant chain. The spot was also home to quite a few scenes in I Love Lucy, most notably the one in which Lucille Ball stares agog at William Holden, whos just trying to order a Cobb salad (so named after Brown Derby co-owner Robert Cobb) in peace.Photo: From Bettmann.The Chateau Marmont

The Chateau Marmont

Built in 1929, the gothic hotel nestled away on Sunset Boulevard has always been a bit more on the rock-and-roll side, thanks to its protective, camera-free atmosphere (well, before smartphones, anyway). Its the sort of place where James Dean could leap out of a window during an audition for Rebel Without a Cause, or where Harry Cohn, then the president of Columbia Pictures, warned rising stars William Holden and Glenn Ford, “If you must get into trouble, do it at the Chateau Marmont.” But sometimes the trouble turns tragic, as in 1982, when comedian John Belushi died of a speedball injection while staying in Bungalow 3.Photo: By Robert Landau/Alamy.Cocoanut Grove

Cocoanut Grove

Lena Horne, Nat King Cole, and Barbra Streisand were frequent performers at this Wilshire Boulevard nightclub, which was part of the Ambassador Hotel. It was also the site of numerous Academy Award ceremonies in the 1930s and 40s. But, like many Old Hollywood establishments, the club also had a racist policy that strictly forbade black guests. When Gone with the Wind was up for numerous Oscars in 1940, film producer David O. Selznick had to call in a special favor to assure actress Hattie McDaniel could attend and accept her best-supporting-actress statuette. “I shall always hold [this award] as a beacon for anything I may be able to do in the future,” she said in her gracious speech.Photo: Clockwise from left, by Ralph Crane/The LIFE Picture Collection, from the Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis, from Express, all from Getty Images.George Cukors house

George Cukors house

The legendary director, who gave us My Fair Lady and The Philadelphia Story, among other classics, was also known about town for having fabulous parties at his Hollywood Hills home, bringing together a variety of famous cinematic and literary figures, from Greta Garbo to Noel Coward. Cukor, who was gay, also created a safe haven for the industrys closeted community, often by throwing private Sunday afternoon pool parties.Photo: Left, from Haynes Archive/Popperfoto; right, by Fred R. Dapprich/Conde Nast, both from Getty Images.The Millennium Biltmore Hotel

The Millennium Biltmore Hotel

The glamorous hotel, founded in 1923, quickly made a mark on Hollywood by hosting the very first Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences meeting. Per legend, production designer Cedric Gibbons even sketched out the first design for the Oscar statuette on a Biltmore restaurant napkin. It was the natural next step, then, for the hotel to host a few Oscar ceremonies, housing guests like Walt Disney and Bette Davis in its lavish ballroom.Photo: By Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images.Formosa Cafe

Formosa Cafe

Conveniently located next to the-then Samuel Goldwyn studio, stars like Humphrey Bogart and James Dean would pop into this narrow, neon West Hollywood spot for food and drinks. On any given day, patrons might have seen Lana Turner dancing past the old, red leather booths, or Elvis Presley nursing a late-night beer. “I always thought this is exactly what Hollywood should look like,” John Waters once said of the joint, which has since closed—but is reportedly on the verge of reopening.Photo: By Jim Steinfeldt/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.PreviousNext

The Mocambo

The Mocambo

The pivotal West Hollywood nightclub, which regularly hosted artists like Dorothy Dandridge and Eartha Kitt, served as the debut spot for two singular performers: Frank Sinatra, who was making his Los Angeles debut as a solo act, and Ella Fitzgerald, who only got a slot thanks to a bit of lobbying from Marilyn Monroe. “She personally called the owner of the Mocambo and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night,” Fitzgerald once said. “The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard. After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again.”From left, by J. R. Eyerman, by Ralph Crane, both from The LIFE Images Collection; By William Gottlieb/Redferns.

The Brown Derby

The Brown Derby

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Clark Gable proposed to Carole Lombard at the Vine St. location of this much-loved restaurant chain. The spot was also home to quite a few scenes in I Love Lucy, most notably the one in which Lucille Ball stares agog at William Holden, whos just trying to order a Cobb salad (so named after Brown Derby co-owner Robert Cobb) in peace.From Bettmann.

The Chateau Marmont

The Chateau Marmont

Built in 1929, the gothic hotel nestled away on Sunset Boulevard has always been a bit more on the rock-and-roll side, thanks to its protective, camera-free atmosphere (well, before smartphones, anyway). Its the sort of place where James Dean could leap out of a window during an audition for Rebel Without a Cause, or where Harry Cohn, then the president of Columbia Pictures, warned rising stars William Holden and Glenn Ford, “If you must get into trouble, do it at the Chateau Marmont.” But sometimes the trouble turns tragic, as in 1982, when comedian John Belushi died of a speedball injection while staying in Bungalow 3.By Robert Landau/Alamy.

Cocoanut Grove

Cocoanut Grove

Lena Horne, Nat King Cole, and Barbra Streisand were frequent performers at this Wilshire Boulevard nightclub, which was part of the Ambassador Hotel. It was also the site of numerous Academy Award ceremonies in the 1930s and 40s. But, like many Old Hollywood establishments, the club also had a racist policy that strictly forbade black guests. When Gone with the Wind was up for numerous Oscars in 1940, film producer David O. Selznick had to call in a special favor to assure actress Hattie McDaniel could attend and accept her best-supporting-actress statuette. “I shall always hold [this award] as a beacon for anything I may be able to do in the future,” she said in her gracious speech.Clockwise from left, by Ralph Crane/The LIFE Picture Collection, from the Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis, from Express, all from Getty Images.

The Beverly Hills Hotel

The Beverly Hills Hotel

The pretty pink hotel off of Sunset Boulevard has long been a hideaway for Hollywoods elite, a place where Howard Hughes could squirrel away in those famously private bungalows. (He favored Bungalow 4 and had staff deliver roast-beef sandwiches in the crook of the nearest tree.) Or where Elizabeth Taylor could spend six of her eight honeymoons. Or where Marlene Dietrich could sip a drink in the legendary Polo Lounge, the hotels restaurant. Fun fact: the actress was such a frequent guest that the hotel changed its “no slacks for women” dress code just for her. The hotel thrives still, though a protest of its current owner, the Sultan of Brunei, damaged its reputation for quite a while.From the LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images.

Ciros

Ciros

The Sunset Strip nightclub was the place to be, frequented by everyone from Marilyn Monroe to Katharine Hepburn to Rat Packers like Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis Jr. It was baroque chic, known for its red ceiling and red silk sofas, celebrities dripping from every table. The club eventually closed up shop after a time, then was reopened and rebranded in 1972 as the Comedy Store, a still-huge venue for comics on the rise.Top, by Peter Stackpole/Life Magazine/The LIFE Picture Collection; bottom, by Dick Whittington Studio/Corbis, both from Getty Images.

Romanoffs

Romanoffs

The tony Beverly Hills restaurant was a favorite of stars—and thus, a favorite of gossip columnists like Louella Parsons and Hedda Hopper. Its also the site of the 1957 Paramount party where rising Italian breakout Sophia Loren tossed infamous side-eye at busty latecomer Jayne Mansfield.By Ralph Crane/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images.

Tom Bergins Tavern

Tom Bergins Tavern

Founded in 1921, this pub was an instant favorite of folks like Bing Crosby and Cary Grant, the latter of whom frequented it so often that he got a booth of his own. The homey pub also had a tradition in which patrons wrote their names on cardboard shamrocks and stuck them on the ceiling. Grants shamrock was still framed above his booth.From ZUMA Press/Alamy.

Chasens

Chasens

Founded in 1936, this West Hollywood spot was overflowing with stars of every stripe, from Howard Hughes to Dorothy Parker to Joan Crawford. Oscar parties were thrown there. Alfred Hitchcock could be seen falling asleep at his favorite booth. Marilyn Monroe would sneak in after a long day of filming, dining solo, too afraid to be seen in her casual after-work slacks. And Elizabeth Taylor was so fond of Chasens chili that she often had it flown to the set of Cleopatra. The restaurant was eventually closed in 1995, but not before its longtime employees and fans gathered together for the documentary Off the Menu: The Last Days of Chasens.Left, from Underwood Archives; right, by Ron Galella/WireImage, both from Getty Images.

Musso & Frank Grill

Musso & Frank Grill

This classic steak spot, which is nearly 100 years old, was favored by Orson Welles, Humphrey Bogart, and Charlie Chaplin. Its got such a pristine vintage aesthetic that it was featured in multiple episodes of Mad Men.By Santi Visalli/Getty Images.

George Cukors house

George Cukors house

The legendary director, who gave us My Fair Lady and The Philadelphia Story, among other classics, was also known about town for having fabulous parties at his Hollywood Hills home, bringing together a variety of famous cinematic and literary figures, from Greta Garbo to Noel Coward. Cukor, who was gay, also created a safe haven for the industrys closeted community, often by throwing private Sunday afternoon pool parties.Left, from Haynes Archive/Popperfoto; right, by Fred R. Dapprich/Conde Nast, both from Getty Images.

The Millennium Biltmore Hotel

The Millennium Biltmore Hotel

The glamorous hotel, founded in 1923, quickly made a mark on Hollywood by hosting the very first Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences meeting. Per legend, production designer Cedric Gibbons even sketched out the first design for the Oscar statuette on a Biltmore restaurant napkin. It was the natural next step, then, for the hotel to host a few Oscar ceremonies, housing guests like Walt Disney and Bette Davis in its lavish ballroom.By Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images.

Formosa Cafe

Formosa Cafe

Conveniently located next to the-then Samuel Goldwyn studio, stars like Humphrey Bogart and James Dean would pop into this narrow, neon West Hollywood spot for food and drinks. On any given day, patrons might have seen Lana Turner dancing past the old, red leather booths, or Elvis Presley nursing a late-night beer. “I always thought this is exactly what Hollywood should look like,” John Waters once said of the joint, which has since closed—but is reportedly on the verge of reopening.By Jim Steinfeldt/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

Yohana DestaYohana Desta is a Hollywood writer for VanityFair.com.

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