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Prince Harry: No guest list yet for wedding to Meghan Markle

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Asked on a BBC radio program whether he would invite former US President Barack Obama Harry swerved the question, saying he didn't want to "ruin that surprise."There has been speculation in the UK media that British officials fear the political consequences if the couple decide to invite Barack and Michelle Obama, with whom they are friends, but not President Donald Trump. Markle, an American actor, has been critical of Trump in the past, and there is already widespread controversy in the UK over the prospect of an official visit by the President to the UK.The wedding is not a full state occasion and the guest list is being drawn up by Buckingham Palace, with the British government in a consultative role. It is not clear whether Downing Street would insist on Trump or a representative being invited, or whether it could block an invitation being extended to the Obamas.The vexed issue came up when Harry appeared as guest editor on BBC Radio 4's flagship morning program, Today, on Wednesday. After a pre-taped exchange between Harry and Obama, the Prince was asked whether his friendship with the former President warranted an invitation to the wedding."We haven't put the invites or the guest list together yet so who knows whether he's going to be invited or not. I wouldn't want to ruin that surprise," the prince said.Harry has become close to the Obamas through their support for the Invictus Games, an event for injured servicemen and women that was started by the UK royal in 2014. The Prince conducted the interview with Obama for BBC Radio 4's Today program while he and the former US President were in Toronto, Canada, for this year's Games. The Prince and Markle, who announced their engagement last month, have set May 19 as their wedding date. The ceremony is to be held in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle, west of London. UK newspapers have already begun speculating over who might be on the guest list, which could bring together an intriguing mix of British and showbiz aristocracy.The wedding is expected to be a smaller affair than that of Harry's brother, Prince William, in 2011. He and his wife, Catherine, had two receptions in Buckingham Palace: a traditional lunch for over 600 guests, which was hosted by the Queen and included dignitaries and officials, and a more intimate evening party for roughly 300 friends and family.Meghan Markle intends to become UK citizen after marriage to Prince HarrySt George's Chapel was most recently the scene of the wedding of Peter Phillips — son of Princess Anne and cousin to Harry — who married Canada-born Autumn Kelly there in 2008.Harry and Markle spent Christmas with Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip, as well as other family members, at Sandringham, the Queen's country estate in rural Norfolk, about 100 miles north of London.Asked on air Wednesday how his first Christmas was with Markle, Harry said they had had an "amazing time" and a lot of fun with William and his family. "Oh it was fantastic, she really enjoyed it. The family loved having her there," he said of his fiancee.Related: How much does a royal wedding cost?

CNN's Hilary McGann and Amanda Coakley contributed to this report.

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UK passports to go blue again after Brexit

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In a statement, Immigration Minister Brandon Lewis said that following the exit from the European Union, British passports would be changed back to their "original" appearance, a blue and gold design from before the UK joined the EU.The blue passports will be issued from October 2019.Lewis said he was "delighted" to announce the decision and called the move symbolic. "Leaving the EU gives us a unique opportunity to restore our national identity and forge a new path for ourselves in the world," he said.Related: Europe says Brexit transition must end in 2020They will have additional security features that include top-of-the-line anti-fraud technology, he added. The new passports will be phased in slowly, with current British passport holders able to continue using their burgundy passports until they expire.After the scheduled Brexit in March 2019, the burgundy passports will continue to be printed, but without the words "European Union."By October 2019, all new British passports will be printed in the blue and gold coloring, which dates back to the original UK passport design from 1921.On Twitter, some said the announcement spoke to a broader divide around Brexit. Gordon McKee, a Scottish Labour party press officer, wrote, "This sums up the unfortunate generational divide on Brexit. I'm not getting a blue passport 'back,' I've never had one. I have though had a passport that allows me visa free travel across Europe all of my life."Comedian Simon Blackwell reacted to the news with a dose of sarcasm. "Why do we need any colour passport? We should just be able to shout, 'British! Less of your nonsense!' and stroll straight through," he wrote.Brexiteers welcomed the decision, including Conservative member of Parliament Michael Fabricant, and former UKIP leader Nigel Farage, who had called for an end to using the burgundy passport in the run-up to the referendum in 2016.In April, Conservative MP Andrew Rosindell told the Press Association that the burgundy passport subjected the nation to "humiliation.""The humiliation of having a pink European Union passport will now soon be over and the United Kingdom nationals can once again feel pride and self-confidence in their own nationality when travelling, just as the Swiss and Americans can do. National identity matters and there is no better way of demonstrating this today than by bringing back this much-loved national symbol when travelling overseas," Rosindell said.

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Rajoy’s efforts to snuff out independence push backfire

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The elections gave the three pro-independence parties a slight majority in the regional Parliament, underscoring the resilience of their vote after three months of upheaval. After a record turnout of over 80%, they won 70 of the 135 seats, compared with 72 in the 2015 elections.But again they won a fraction less than half of the total votes cast (nearly 48%), slightly less than they did in 2015. The party of former Catalan President Carlos Puigdemont won 34 seats — even though he has been in self-imposed exile in Belgium since October. Puigdemont described the vote as a slap in the face for Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy."We have won this election in exceptional circumstances, with candidates in prison, with the government in exile and without having the same resources as the state," Puigdemont said in Brussels.And he issued a challenge to Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy: a meeting without preconditions somewhere in Europe to resolve the crisis.Center-right party Ciudadanos (Citizens) candidate Inés  Arrimadas (R) celebrates the poll results in the Catalan regional election. The party is known locally as CiutadansRajoy wasn't taking the bait. In remarks in Madrid Friday, he said the vote showed that Catalonia was deeply divided. And he pointed out that a pro-union party, Ciudadanos (Citizens), known in Catalonia as Ciutadans, had outpolled every other party. It became the largest in the Catalan parliament, with 37 seats.The trouble for Rajoy is that his own Popular Party was hammered — losing eight of its 11 seats in the Parliament. His goal of lancing the boil of the Catalan separatist movement through these elections has backfired. Party spokesman Rafael Hernando said only that the government and Senate in Madrid remained the most solid guarantee against the forces of independence. Related: Spain's Rajoy rejects ex-Catalan leader's call to meetThe result suggests further uncertainty in a region that accounts for a quarter of Spain's gross domestic product, and possibly months of haggling over the formation of a regional government, with seven parties represented in the Parliament. The pro-independence parties are not exactly a coherent bloc, and if they fail to form a government by April next year there would be yet another election. Voters line up outside a polling station in Barcelona, Spain. Forming a majority will be complicated by the fact that several of those elected are either in detention or self-imposed exile. In effect, Rajoy's attempt to resolve the crisis through new elections has only cemented the status quo. But the pro-independence parties will probably think twice before trying an encore in declaring Catalonia's separation from Spain, given the sequence of events that was triggered in October. Additionally, the most radical of the pro-independence parties, the Popular Unity Candidacy (CUP), did very poorly and in winning less than half the popular vote they lack a mandate to declare independence. The upheaval — the worst constitutional crisis in Spain's four decades as a democracy — began with the Catalan government holding a referendum on the region's future on October 1, despite it being declared illegal by Spain's Constitutional Court. The vote was marred by violence, with the Civil Guard sent in by Madrid to try to prevent voting. Despite a boycott by most pro-union voters, the separatist parties used the result to push the declaration of independence through Parliament. That led Madrid to dissolve the Catalan government, arrest leading pro-independence politicians and call fresh elections.The turmoil has had a chilling effect on Catalonia's economy, Foreign investment fell by 75% in the third quarter of this year compared to a year ago. Two of Spain's largest banks — Caixa and Sabadell — decided to move their headquarters out of Catalonia — as did some 3,000 other companies. The latest result, and the uncertainty that lies ahead, won't have them hurrying back to Catalonia.

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