Arts

Home Arts

Smithsonian provost overseeing Cooper Hewitt after ouster of director

0

Caroline Baumann, then the director of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, at the institution's 2017 National Design Awards gala in New York Scott Rudd/Sipa USA, via AP Images

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York is under the interim directorship of the Smithsonian Institutions provost following the controversial ouster of its director arising from an inquiry related to her 2018 wedding.

The provost, John Davis, who also holds the title of undersecretary for museums, education and research, already oversees all 19 of the Smithsonian museums, many research units, the National Zoo, multiple offices and programs related to education and the Smithsonian press and libraries. A Smithsonian spokeswoman, relaying Daviss interim role at the Cooper Hewitt, says that the institution was also preparing to begin a hunt for a new director and would form a search committee.

The New York Times reported that the museums director, Caroline Baumann, was forced to resign from her position on 7 February after an investigation by the Smithsonians inspector general into how she obtained the dress for her 18 September 2018 wedding and secured the site for the ceremony. The newspaper said that the inspector general had questioned the discrepancy between the $750 Baumann paid for the dress, created by the designer Samantha Sleeper, and the $3,000 starting price for gowns advertised on Sleepers website.

The Cooper Hewitt plays a key role in showcasing design and designers through its exhibitions and events like its National Design Awards.

The Smithsonians inquiry also focused on the location of the ceremony, LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton, New York, which has ties to the Cooper Hewitt and did not charge Baumann for the use of its facilities, the Times reported.

The museum declined to comment on the inquiry or the reason for the directors ouster, saying that her departure was a confidential personnel matter.

Six trustees on the Cooper Hewitts advisory board have resigned to protest Read More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Sun and sales on the best coast: LAs second edition of Frieze firms up the citys art market potential

0

Fair visitors chat outside of Thaddaeus Ropac's booth at the second edition of Frieze LA. © David Owens

“Do you think you could live here?” It is a question repeatedly heard asked in Los Angeles for the second West Coast edition of Frieze Art Fair, always by a New York- or London-based dealer, adviser, curator, etc. It is no secret that the siren call of California sun in mid-February has anyone working in cooler climes reconsidering their life choices. But underlying the seemingly innocuous question at this years Frieze is a much larger one: does LA have what it takes to become the art trades next big hub?

The star-studded first edition of the fair last year was deemed a success, but whether the Endeavor entertainment agency-backed fair could pull it off again has been preying on the minds of many. Speedy sales during Friezes VIP day on Thursday, however, certainly seem to suggest there was little cause for worry: there is plenty of spending power and collector grace in the City of Angels.

In the opening hours of the fair, Pace Gallery and Kayne Griffin Corcoran sold four works from James Turrells recent Glass series from their joint booth devoted to the Pasadena-born artist, who has been embraced by the public and celebrities alike since his 2014 retrospective at LACMA. Most of the works reportedly went to local collectors, including Kardashian royalty—Kendall Jenner was among those picking up work by the Light and Space artist.

Hauser & Wirth sold all five of Avery Singer's new works, priced from $85,000 to $495,000, after recently announcing its representation of the artist. David Zwirners sales topped $8m during the first day with Neo Rauch's $2m Aprilnacht (2011); five paintings by Lisa Yuskavage, each priced between $120,000 and $1m; and two works by Carol Bove for $500,000. Early on at Thaddaeus Ropacs booth, Robert Rauschenbergs Bowery Parade (Borealis) (1989) sold for $1.3m.

At Lissons stand, a gold mirrored Anish Kapoor work sold for $700,000 and Allora & Calzadillas Electromagnetic Field (2019) went for $145,000. Lehmann Maupin reported that a number of works by Lee Bul, Liu Wei and Liza Lou sold, including a major work by LA-based Lou named Shelter from the Storm to a US collector for $275,000.

Local galleries cleaned up as well. Various Small Fires solo booth dedicated to Calinda Rawles, whose dreamy yet photorealistic pool paintings are also on view at the gallerys space in Hollywood, sold out within a couple of hours. Priced between $14,000 and $30,000 each, the gallerys co-founder Esther Kim Varet says she was surprised by the rapid-fire pace of sales. “It kind of feels like the next Miami—which has felt kind of stale to me over the past couple of years,” she says.

Next door at Chateau Shattos booth, co-founder Olivia Barret says its works by Aria Dean and Helen Johnson had sold by the afternoon. All priced at $9,000, Deans work will be included in in the upcoming Made in LA biennial opening at the Hammer Museum in May. Johnsons smaller paintings sold for $15,000 while Basic Needs (2020), the largest and the centrepiece of the booth, sold for $75,000. “Frieze LA is kind of condensed, its manageable,” Barret says, noting the fairs cap at roughly 70 exhibitors makes it easier to close sales.

At Felix, the homegrown hotel fair launched last year in response to Frieze by the LA dealer Al Moran and collector Dean Valentine, exhibitor numbers swelled by 50% for the second edition bringing its participant count close to Friezes. More was evidently better: the London gallery Alison Jacques sold $1.3m worth of work during the VIP day, also on Thursday—a sizeable sum for any satellite fair presentation, suggesting that Felix has plenty of its own gravity. Among the works sold at Jacquess stand was a number of works by Sheila Hicks, including a new installation, Amathyst Forest (2020), priced at $550,000, a woven panel for $135,000 and a series of new Comet sculptures for$90,000 each. The gallery also sold works on paper by Hannah Wilke ranging fromRead More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Whats old is new (and vice-versa)

0

Adam Linder: Shelf Life, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2020) Photo: Denis Doorly

Some of us are pleased, or at least are not surprised, when a gallery bets on mystifying new art. Who doesnt enjoy making discoveries? Because context is everything, it is a whole other proposition when a museum known best for its historical collections takes the same risks.

That is what the Museum of Modern Art is doing with its new Kravis Studio, a soaring gray cube dedicated to the presentation of media and the live arts. At the opening of the expanded building, the Studio gloriously housed a new variation of Rainforest V, a 1973 sound and sculptural installation by David Tudor that took supreme advantage of the gallerys advanced acoustics and lighting. People could wander through the “forest” of instruments (made of household junk) suspended from the ceiling or sit on benches; during performances a sliding door closed off access to adjacent rooms, totally immersing audiences in the environment.

No such luck for the Studios new, linked exhibitions, Shelf Life by the choreographer Adam Linder, and Force Life by the artist Shahryar Nashat. The Angeleno artists live together but usually do not work together. Not that this is a collaboration, exactly. The two works on view fulfill the Studios other purpose: to provide a workshop for younger artists to experiment and introduce new ideas, forms or technologies. (MoMAs media and performance curator Stuart Comer compares it to Fluxus group activities.)

At the 1 February opening, attended by a hardcore, inner-artworld group of artists, curators, dealers and critics, I did not respond well to Linders hour-long dance. Though a potentially transformative take on the tension between artificial intelligence and human intervention, ), I found the piece so deep in old tropes and so invested in the banal that I retreated to the adjacent gallery to watch the more precedent-setting film of Trisha Browns Man Walking Down the Side of a Building (1970), from a cushioned seat. During the live performance, there was room for a small number of viewers to sit on the floor along the sides; standing meant catching glimpses through heads.

I dont mind a little discomfort in art, but this piece tried my patience. The best part of Linders performance was the hinge action, when four dancers (out of six who rotate) made the changeover to Nashats video wall, accompanied by a disembodied female voice reminiscent of the robot that alerts the crew of a doomed spaceship of its imminent self-destruction.

I tried to think of the dancers as motion-captured, posthuman sculpture. It didn't help. Especially since Nashat had three actual, static sculptures of more visual interest right there, almost as stage props, with which the dancers did not engage. Yet I could plainly see that the Gen-Xers in the room were intently wrapped up in the proceedings. Because of that, and because Linder arrived with encomiums from performances in other institutions, and because this was MoMA, I went back a few days later with the Hammer Museum curator Aram Moshayedi to check my responses against his and the publics.

Moshayedi did not love the spoken text (a one-sided, morning-after phone conversation), but he and others were moved by the repetitive, robotic movements of the dancers, whom I still found unexceptional. If this werent MoMA, I might have expected less.

My companion appreciated Linders attempt to make dance about something other than a sensate human body. (Why bother?) And dismissed the pleasures of virtuosity when its displacement could reveal other truths. (Hmm.) Another curator judged the piece semi-successful, applauding Linders determination to imagine the Baudrillardian future in terms of dance. Point taken. But that is a future that doesnt interest me. And its here, now, anyway.

How effectively can a sanitizing museum of modernism—especially one with so storied a venue for the contemporary as PS1—mine the unsettled, or unsettling, art of this moment, about which most bets are off?

Uri Aran, House, installation views at Gavin Browns enterprise New York Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Browns enterprise New York/Rome. Photo: Thomas Müller.

A few days later, Gavin Brown Enterprise provided an answer of sorts with House, an exhibition of sculpture, drawing, painting and video by Uri Aran. Galleries, which sometimes trump museums in terms of scale and speed of presentation, do new art best. Even when it has ancient resonance.Read More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Championing African American abstraction: inside the collection of Pamela Joyner

0

Pamela Joyner has championed Black artists for 25 years Drew Altizer

A founding partner of a marketing firm in San Francisco that provides consulting services for private equity and capital venture funds, Pamela Joyner is even better known as an art collector. For the last 25 years, the San Francisco-based philanthropist has championed black artists, particularly those delving into abstraction. Currently, highlights of the collection that she has assembled with her husband, the investor Alfred Giuffrida, are touring the country in the exhibition Solidary & Solitary.

The Art Newspaper: How did you get your start as a collector?

Pamela Joyner: In the 1990s I started buying art; like a lot of people, I was buying to fill walls. Then I got to know certain artists and developed a narrative from there.

Were you focusing on African American artists from the start?

Yes, because I was aware that there was a deficit in museum visibility, an absence of key collectors and an absence in the gallery system. I wanted a different experience, at least in my own home. Then we moved to being a mission-driven collection focused on helping artists and institutions rectify that void.

Do you think the tide has turned?

Oh, I think theres been a major shift. A young generation of curators—emblematic of that is Mark Godfrey at the Tate—have discovered that theres real substance out there. Another factor is the successful mid-career artists: Julie Mehretu, Mark Bradford and Kerry James Marshall in particular. The galleries recognised their calibre and said, well, who else is out there? When they looked, they discovered the Jack Whittens and the Mel Edwardses and the Sam Gilliams of the world.

You have a particularly deep commitment to abstract works.

During the rise of the civil rights movement, artists were encouraged to make representational work that depicted African American uplift, but they wanted to demonstrate their skills in a broader context and just wouldnt be put in that box. Ed Clark is now recognised as the first artist in the modern era to work on shaped canvases. Jack Whitten did squeegee paintings in the 1970s—at least a decade before Gerhard Richter. And Sam Gilliam innovates with his monumental drape paintings.

Installation view of the Smart Museum's presentation of Solidary & Solitary, showing works by Sam Gilliam, Charles Gaines, Leonardo Drew, and Melvin Edwards. Courtesy of Smart Museum

Can you describe some of your most exciting recent acquisitions?

There are a number of young artists who are getting very good, very fast, like Jadé Fadojutimi, who is based in London, Firelei Báez, represented by Jim Cohan, or Jordan Casteel, who has a large show coming up at the New Museum. Another artist we own very deeply is Kevin Beasley.

Have you got to know the artists?

We run an artists residency in Sonoma, and Casteel, Beasley and Báez have all been there. Last night, we hosted an event for Charles Gaines–hes like family.

Are there any particular artists youd like to get acquainted with?

Wed love to get to know Kara Walker better. Nathaniel Mary Quinn is a young artist I havent got to know well. And Simone Leigh is coming to our residency in the spring with two other women artists to exchange ideas. Thats an innovative way to use the space.

What has the response been to the traveling exhibition of highlights from your collection?

My favourite pRead More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Women demand their due

0

Michele Preds campaign is encouraging women artists to raise their prices by 15% on Equal Pay Day Courtesy of Michele Pred

Some people look like they are made of money. Then there is Oakland artist Michele Pred, ready to make the rounds at Frieze this week in a dress covered with dozens of pink dollar bills, each stamped: “EQUAL PAY”. Her appearance is the kick-off to a larger project in which she asks women artists to raise their prices by 15% on the same day—31 March, Equal Pay Day in the US—in a concerted, attention-getting attempt to close the gender pay gap for artists.

Best known for politically pointed work like her feminist-slogan handbags, Pred hopes that this project, The Art of Equal Pay, will effect some real-world change. “I felt that I needed to do something even more action-oriented this time,” she says. “For me, the pace of change on this important issue is agonisingly slow.”

At this stage, she is asking women artists, their dealers and potential collectors to sign a pledge on her website, theartofequalpay.com, to participate in the 15% price hike in March. Admittedly, the figure is symbolic (according to national studies, women on average make 79 cents for every dollar earned by men in the US) and probably less than the actual pay discrepancy for works sold directly by artists or through their galleries, since those numbers are not readily available. “We know the price gap between men and women artists sold at auction—around 47%,” Pred says. “But I didnt want to use that number because artists dont actually earn anything from auction sales.”

The artist Michele Pred Photo: Bud Snow

Pred hopes to have better data points on gallery sales to use later this year from Taylor Whitten-Brown, a sociologist and data Read More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

V&A dusts off Louis Vuitton trunk of American beauty for handbags exhibition

0

A detail of Emilie Grigsby's Louis Vuitton trunk, which travelled the world with her in the first half of the 20th century Photo: courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum

A Louis Vuitton trunk that came to Londons Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) more than half a century ago—as a useful container for the glamorous wardrobe of a society hostess—has been conserved for display for the first time in the museums Bags: Inside Out exhibition, opening on 25 April.

The trunk belonged to Emilie Grigsby, a renowned American beauty whose Mayfair home became a salon in the early 20th century and was frequented by the poet W.B. Yeats and the sculptor Auguste Rodin. The poet Rupert Brooke is said to have spent his last night in England at Grigsbys country house. An obituary published by The Times in 1964 recalled: “she could out entertain her rivals with wines and cooking beyond their ken.”

American socialite Emilie Grigsby played host to Auguste Rodin and W.B. Yeats in her Mayfair home Photo: Library of Congress

Now formally catalogued as a museum object, the trunk is covered in labels recording Grigsbys travels in the grandest days of ocean liners, including voyages on the Lusitania, on the Titanics sister ship the Olympic, and with fellow passengers Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald on the Aquitania.

The V&As conservation team, led by Roisin Morris, gently cleaned it inside and out, removing corrosion around tack heads, securing flaking paper and decaying leather, and hand stitching tattered silk ribbons inside.

The trunk is covered in labels recording Grigsby's voyages on ocean liners such as the Lusitania Photo: courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum

As a young widow with debts and two small children, Grigsbys mother repaired the family fortunes by opening an upmarket brothel in Cincinnati. Grigsby, born in 1879, moved tRead More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Louvre to open non-stop over closing weekend of Leonardo blockbuster show

0

Visitors admire La Belle Ferronnière at the Louvre show Photo: Aurore Marechal/ABACA/PA Images

The Leonardo da Vinci exhibition at the Louvre in Paris will remain open non-stop for almost 81 hours over the closing weekend, with free admission for visitors attending the blockbuster show in the early hours.

The exhibition will be open from 9am on Friday 21 February to 5.45pm on Sunday 24 February, with free entry for all tickets booked between 9pm and 8:30am over the final three consecutive nights (a full-priced ticket, which also gives access to the museums permanent collection, costs €17). They will be available from Tuesday 11 February through the Louvres booking website.

Up to 30,000 extra visitors will be able to see the show, say Louvre officials, who add that “this event is the Louvres way of thanking the public for their interest in the exhibition” (visitor figures so far for the show are unavailable). A spokeswoman adds that visitors at night will also be offered free coffee and madeleine cakes.

The exhibition, which opened last October, marks the 500th anniversary of the artists death in France. The Louvre managed to secure four autograph Leonardo paintings (Benois Madonna, the lesser-known La Scapiliata, St Jerome and Portrait of a Musician) for the exhibition in addition to the five masterpieces it owns including La Belle Ferronnière (around 1495-99) and Virgin of the Rocks (aroundRead More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Collector David Roberts—who closed London gallery to bring art to the regions—will focus 2020 programme on Scotland

0

Paul Maheke, Melika Ngombe Kolongo (Nkisi) and Ariel Efraim Ashbel performing Sènsa (2019) at ASSEMBLE, Volksbühne, Berlin Photo: Frank Sperling

Artists Lina Lapelytė, Paul Maheke and Nina Beier will present a series of new live performance works at this years Glasgow International contemporary art festival (28 April-10 May) backed by the non-profit David Roberts Art Foundation (Draf). The move is part of Scottish collector David Roberts strategy to expand to the UK regions; in 2017, Roberts closed his gallery in Camden, north London, after five years.

“The main focus [in 2020] will be Scotland, to strengthen existing links with organisations in Glasgow, Edinburgh and others to be announced,” a project statement says. The Glasgow International performance event, due to take place 23 April, includes the UK premiere of a new work by French-born Maheke, commissioned by the Renaissance Society in Chicago. Aarhus-born Beier will preview a new commission due to be shown at the MoCo contemporary art centre in Montepellier later this year.

One of the main Glasgow International venues is the Gallery of Modern Art, which was mentioned in a recent budget review conducted by Glasgow city council. Closing the gallery is one option put forward to help balance budgets. “There is obviously a fantastic art scene in Glasgow but it would be a great shame if Glasgow did not have a dedicated museum for modern art,” Roberts says.

He adds: “Were not just working in Scotland though. In 2018 we collaborated with Mostyn gallery [in Llandudno, north Wales] on a group exhibition of works from the collection which was very well received. We want to draw on that experience in a project were planning in Sheffield; we will be more regional in focus.”

Every October, Draf hosts an evening of performance works during Frieze week in London (the 2019 edition took place at the Ministry of Sound club, featuring artists suchRead More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Teenager from remote Russian town draws pop superstar Billie Eilish for Vogue cover

0

The 18-year-old US pop superstar Billie Eilish might seem worlds away from Chaykovsky, a town in Russia's Permsky Krai. But in the latest instance to prove that Generation Z has no borders, a depiction of the singer by Nastya Kovtun, a 16-year-old resident of the city, was chosen via Instagram to serve as a Vogue magazinedigital cover.

The town, which lies just over 1,200 km east of Moscow and has a population just over 80,000, was founded in the 1950s as a settlement for hydroelectric plant workers. It was named after the 19th-century composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who was born in the nearby town Votkinsk.

“Kovtun, who drew Eilish in a Louis Vuitton dress, is now the youngest person to have ever held a Vogue digital cover,” Vogue reported on Monday. She and another young artist, Kaylee Young from Canton, Michigan, were recommended by Eilish, and both at first did not believe that they had been selected when contacted by Vogue. The singer has liked 15 Instagram posts by Kovtun, who was inspired by Eilish's moody music and as a result now has nearly 10,000 Instagram followers. Kovtuns Instagram bio is to the point: “I'm 16 and I love to draw.”

Since the announcement, Kovtun has received attention from the state media and various tabloids, who have reported on her success. Ivan Urgant, one of Russias most popular television hosts, also gave Kovtun a shoutout on his late-night show.

KovRead More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Teenager from remote Russian town draws pop superstar Billie Eilish for Vogue cover

0

The 18-year-old US pop superstar Billie Eilish might seem worlds away from Chaykovsky, a town in Russia's Permsky Krai. But in the latest instance to prove that Generation Z has no borders, a depiction of the singer by Nastya Kovtun, a 16-year-old resident of the city, was chosen via Instagram to serve as a Vogue magazinedigital cover.

The town, which lies just over 1,200 km east of Moscow and has a population just over 80,000, was founded in the 1950s as a settlement for hydroelectric plant workers. It was named after the 19th-century composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who was born in the nearby town Votkinsk.

“Kovtun, who drew Eilish in a Louis Vuitton dress, is now the youngest person to have ever held a Vogue digital cover,” Vogue reported on Monday. She and another young artist, Kaylee Young from Canton, Michigan, were recommended by Eilish, and both at first did not believe that they had been selected when contacted by Vogue. The singer has liked 15 Instagram posts by Kovtun, who was inspired by Eilish's moody music and as a result now has nearly 10,000 Instagram followers. Kovtuns Instagram bio is to the point: “I'm 16 and I love to draw.”

Since the announcement, Kovtun has received attention from the state media and various tabloids, who have reported on her success. Ivan Urgant, one of Russias most popular television hosts, also gave Kovtun a shoutout on his late-night show.

KovRead More – Source

[contf]
[contfnew]

the art news paper

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Popular Posts

My Favorites