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Still learning: Experts and survivors discover Covid-19s lingering effects

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An angelic voice singing “Hallelujah” echoes off the stately stone and brick canyons of a narrow Montmartre street.

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Still struggling with Covid-19 complications two months after falling ill, Parisian soprano Veronica Antonelli wanted the impromptu performance from her third-floor balcony to project hope. Hours earlier, her doctor had delivered troubling news: The lung scarring that sometimes makes her too tired to sing may last for months. Or maybe years.

“It makes things a bit complicated, given my profession,” Antonelli said sadly.

The virus that has sickened over 4 million people around the world and killed more than 280,000 others is so new that patients face considerable uncertainty about what they can expect in recovery and beyond.

“The short answer is that were still learning,” said Dr. Jay Varkey, an infectious disease specialist at Emory University in Atlanta. “What we know has been gathered mostly by anecdotal reports from Covid-19 survivors.”

In support groups created on social media sites, survivors post head-to-toe complaints that read like a medical encyclopedia: anxiety, heart palpitations, muscle aches, bluish toes. Its hard to know which ones are clearly related to the virus, but the accounts help fuel doctors increasing belief that Covid-19 is not just a respiratory disease.

We just have to be patient

Persistent exhaustion is a common theme, but every survivors story is different, said Brandy Swayze, a coronavirus sufferer who created a Facebook survivors group after developing pneumonia. She was hospitalized in late March and early April. Her fatigue comes and goes. Insomnia is another concern.

Still learning: Experts and survivors discover Covid-19s lingering effects

0

An angelic voice singing “Hallelujah” echoes off the stately stone and brick canyons of a narrow Montmartre street.

Advertising

Read more

Still struggling with Covid-19 complications two months after falling ill, Parisian soprano Veronica Antonelli wanted the impromptu performance from her third-floor balcony to project hope. Hours earlier, her doctor had delivered troubling news: The lung scarring that sometimes makes her too tired to sing may last for months. Or maybe years.

“It makes things a bit complicated, given my profession,” Antonelli said sadly.

The virus that has sickened over 4 million people around the world and killed more than 280,000 others is so new that patients face considerable uncertainty about what they can expect in recovery and beyond.

“The short answer is that were still learning,” said Dr. Jay Varkey, an infectious disease specialist at Emory University in Atlanta. “What we know has been gathered mostly by anecdotal reports from Covid-19 survivors.”

In support groups created on social media sites, survivors post head-to-toe complaints that read like a medical encyclopedia: anxiety, heart palpitations, muscle aches, bluish toes. Its hard to know which ones are clearly related to the virus, but the accounts help fuel doctors increasing belief that Covid-19 is not just a respiratory disease.

We just have to be patient

Persistent exhaustion is a common theme, but every survivors story is different, said Brandy Swayze, a coronavirus sufferer who created a Facebook survivors group after developing pneumonia. She was hospitalized in late March and early April. Her fatigue comes and goes. Insomnia is another concern.

Covid-19: Donald Trump keeps putting the US economy first

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Amid the Covid-19 pandemic, the face mask has become commonplace in many countries across the World. Yet in the United States, it continues to divide. President Donald Trump is a prime example. Despite over 80,000 deaths in his country, the president continues to refuse to wear a mask, just like other senior members of his administration. We take a look at whether or not this will change after two White House staff members tested positive for coronavirus.

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Also on the show: Rio de Janeiro plunges into a health crisis. The Brazilian city known for its vibrant lifestyle is now one of the epicentres of the coronavirus pandemic in South America. ORead More – Source

[contf] [contfnew]

france24

[contfnewc] [contfnewc]

Covid-19: Donald Trump keeps putting the US economy first

0

Issued on: Modified:

Amid the Covid-19 pandemic, the face mask has become commonplace in many countries across the World. Yet in the United States, it continues to divide. President Donald Trump is a prime example. Despite over 80,000 deaths in his country, the president continues to refuse to wear a mask, just like other senior members of his administration. We take a look at whether or not this will change after two White House staff members tested positive for coronavirus.

Advertising

Also on the show: Rio de Janeiro plunges into a health crisis. The Brazilian city known for its vibrant lifestyle is now one of the epicentres of the coronavirus pandemic in South America. ORead More – Source

[contf] [contfnew]

france24

[contfnewc] [contfnewc]

Bolsonaro allows Brazilians to go to gyms and hair salons as Covid-19 cases spike

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro on Monday declared gyms and hair salons as essential services that can stay open through the new coronavirus outbreak, easing measures to control the disease despite new cases and deaths surging in the country.

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Brazil has now registered a total of 168,331 confirmed cases of the virus and is closing in on the number of cases recorded in Germany and France, where the outbreak has been slowing. To date, Brazil has confirmed 11,519 deaths due to the disease.

The president has argued that state and municipal governments have gone overboard in social isolation measures to restrict the disease's spread and that it is overly damaging to the economy.

"The question of life has to be taken in parallel with jobs," Bolsonaro told reporters outside his official residence. "Without the economy there is no life, there are no doctors, there are no hospital supplies."

Bolsonaro's latest decree allowing more establishments to stay open comes as Brazil registered 5,632 new coronavirus cases on Monday and 396 deaths from the disease, according to the Health Ministry.

After initially decreeing that establishments such as pharmacies and grocery stores were essential, Bolsonaro later expanded that list to include lotteries and churches.

This third decree expands the list of essential business further, also extending it to industrial production and civil construction, with Bolsonaro promising even more easing to come.

Georgia attorney general requests US Justice Dept investigation into killing of black jogger

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The Georgia state attorney general on Sunday asked the US Department of Justice to investigate the handling of an unarmed black jogger's killing, which sparked outrage across the country.

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Ahmaud Arbery, 25, was killed on February 23 as he ran on a sunny day in a residential neighbourhood in the town of Brunswick. Two white men were arrested for his shooting just last week.

"I have formally requested US DOJ (@SDGAnews) to conduct an investigation into the handling of the case," Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr tweeted, linking to an official statement.

In the statement, Carr said his office is "committed to a complete and transparent review of how the Ahmaud Arbery case was handled from the outset."

"The family, the community and the state of Georgia deserve answers," Carr said in the statement.

According to the statement, the request "includes, but is not limited to, investigation of the communications and discussions by and between" the district attorneys' offices for the Brunswick judicial circuit and the Waycross judicial circuit — both were involved in the original case.

Arbery's case gained national notoriety last week with the release of a 28-second cell phone video that captured the shooting.

Guardian Angels: New York citizen crime-fighters tackle Covid-19 crisis

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The Guardian Angels, a volunteer citizen crime-fighting organisation, have been patrolling the streets of New York City for four decades. But with the city still emerging from the grip of the Covid-19 crisis, they say they are busier than ever amid a spike in burglaries.

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New York has been hard hit by the Covid-19 pandemic with around 20,000 deaths. Although overall crime has fallen in the city in recent weeks, burglaries soared 169 percent in April, with thieves targeting shuttered businesses.

“Our services have never been more in need then now during this pandemic of coronavirus, because there's lawlessness, breaking into stores, robberies, thuggery, prisoners are being released from the jails because of coronavirus. And there are just not enough police,” Curtis Sliwa, founder of the Guardian Angels, whose members are trained to carry out citizens arrests on suspected wrongdoers, told AFP.

But it is not just violent crime the group is battling. It is also helping to make sure the citys most vulnerable are not forgotten amid the pandemic.

"Homelessness and the EDPs that are out there, the emotionally disturbed people, that is now a focus,” said volunteer Read More – Source

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france24

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Three White House task force members, including Fauci, in self-quarantine after Covid-19 exposure

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Three officials guiding the U.S. response to the coronavirus pandemic were in self-quarantine on Saturday after coming into contact with someone who had tested positive for the disease, their agencies and spokesmen said.

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Anthony Fauci, a high-profile member of the White House coronavirus response team, is considered to be at relatively low risk based on the degree of his exposure, according to a representative for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Fauci, the 79-year-old director of that institute, has tested negative for COVID-19 and he will continue to be tested regularly, the official said in an emailed statement.

Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), "will be teleworking for the next two weeks" after a "low-risk exposure" on Wednesday to a person at the White House who has the disease, the CDC said in a statement.

Redfield is 68 years old. He is "feeling fine" and has no symptoms, the statement added.

If required to go to the White House, Redfield will follow the CDC's safety practices like taking temperature, screening for symptoms each day, wearing a face covering, and distancing, the CDC said.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Stephen Hahn, who is 60, is also in self-quarantine for a couple of weeks after coming into contact with someone who tested positive for the illness, an FDA spokesman told Reuters late on Friday.

US withdraws support for UN Security Council global ceasefire resolution

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The United States on Friday stunned other members of the UN Security Council by preventing a vote on a resolution for a ceasefire in various conflicts around the world to help troubled nations better fight the coronavirus pandemic, diplomats said.

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Washington's reversal came a day after it agreed to the text, negotiators said under cover of anonymity.

"The United States cannot support the current draft," the country's delegation declared, without further detail, to the 14 other Security Council members, after nearly two months of difficult negotiation over the text.

The latest stalemate continues to leave the global peace and security body largely mute in the face of a once-in-a-century pandemic that has killed more than 270,000 people and raised further fears for the world's most vulnerable.

When asked for an explanation of the US move, a State Department official told AFP that China had "repeatedly blocked compromises that would have allowed the Council to move forward."

Diplomats told AFP that the language used in the draft to describe the World Health Organization was behind the US move to prevent the vote.

But other sources said Washington wanted the Council to return to an initial draft of the resolution which highlighted the need for "transparency" in global cooperation in tackling the pandemic.

Biden should quit White House race, says sexual assault accuser Tara Reade

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The woman who accused Joe Biden of sexually assaulting her in 1993 called on him to drop out of the US presidential race, saying Thursday she'd take a polygraph about the alleged encounter if he would.

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Tara Reade said in March that Biden, the Democratic Party's presumptive presidential nominee, sexually assaulted her in a Capitol Hill corridor 27 years ago when she was a 29-year-old aide in the then-senator's office.

The accusation is the biggest imbroglio of Biden's presidential campaign. The candidate has denied wrongdoing.

"Joe Biden, please step forward and be held accountable. You should not be running on character for the president of the United States," Reade told journalist Megyn Kelly in a clip released Thursday.

"You want him to withdraw?" Kelly asks.

"I wish he would, but he won't," she said, adding that "I think it's a little late" for an apology.

It was Reade's first on-camera interview since Biden, 77, released a statement Friday saying the incident "never happened."

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