USA Topics

Home USA Topics

French citizen dies in custody of US immigration agents

0

Issued on: Modified:

A French citizen and native of Angola has died in the custody of US immigration agents, they said on Wednesday, the latest in a number of deaths during a US crackdown on illegal immigrants.

Advertising

Read more

A statement from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) identified the person only as "a 40-year-old native of Angola and citizen of France."

They said the person died on Sunday at a hospital in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

"An autopsy is pending to determine the official cause of death," ICE said, adding that French consular officials have been notified and "are attempting to locate the next of kin."

Reached by AFP, a French embassy spokeswoman said she could not elaborate "at this stage," beyond what is in the ICE statement

The death follows that of Nebane Abienwi, 37, of Cameroon, who ICE said died in its custody in San Diego, California in October after a brain hemorrhage.

Later that month a Cuban, Roylan Hernandez-Diaz, 53, died of an apparent suicide while in ICE custody in Louisiana, the agency said.

Mexico calls diplomatic meeting to protest Bolivian ‘harassment’ over Morales asylum

0

Issued on: Modified:

Mexico's Foreign Ministry on Wednesday requested a meeting with Bolivia's charge d'affaires to protest the "harassment and intimidation" of its diplomatic personnel in the Bolivian city La Paz.

Advertising

Read more

Since Monday, Mexico has accused Bolivia of ramping up police presence outside its embassy and intimidating diplomats.

The spat follows a chill in relations after Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador last month gave political asylum to former Bolivian president Evo Morales, a fellow leftist.

Mexico's Foreign Ministry said it called a meeting for Thursday so that the Bolivian charge d'affaires can "explain the behavior of Bolivian authorities," the ministry said in a statement.

It added that nine people are being housed in diplomatic facilities in Bolivia under Mexico's protection.

In a letter to BoliviaRead More – Source

[contf] [contfnew]

france24

[contfnewc] [contfnewc]

Trump seeks ‘immediate’ Senate impeachment trial and swift exoneration

0

Issued on: Modified:

US President Donald Trump pressed his Republican allies Thursday to exert rigid control of his Senate trial and ensure a swift exoneration, a day after he was impeached in a historic rebuke by the House of Representatives.

Advertising

Read more

A bitter fight looms over the coming trial, expected to begin as early as the second week of January, with Senate leaders already drawing battle lines over the evidence that will be allowed.

But its fate was left in limbo late Thursday when the Senate's powerful majority leader, Mitch McConnell signalled the standoff with Democrats over trial particulars would continue into the new year.

"We remain at an impasse on these logistics," McConnell said on the floor, as he announced the Senate had completed its business until January.

Trump seized on the uncertainty to attack House Democrats for seeking to demand key witnesses or dictate how McConnell should run the process.

"I want an immediate trial!" he boomed on Twitter.

So after the Democrats gave me no Due Process in the House, no lawyers, no witnesses, no nothing, they now want to tell the Senate how to run their trial. Actually, they have zero proof of anything, they will never even show up. They want out. I want an immediate trial!

Fall of a heavyweight? Colombia’s ex-president Uribe faces charges in Supreme Court

0

Issued on: Modified:

Colombia's former president Alvaro Uribe once enjoyed sky-high support for the way he dealt with the country's FARC guerrillas. But a decade on from his presidency, it's a very different story, with Colombia's Supreme Court ordering an investigation into Uribe for allegedly manipulating witnesses. Our correspondents report.

Advertising

A prRead More – Source

[contf] [contfnew]

france24

[contfnewc] [contfnewc]

Bolivias former president Morales arrives in Argentina to seek asylum

0

Issued on: Modified:

Bolivia's exiled ex-president Evo Morales arrived in Buenos Aires on Thursday where he is to seek political asylum, Argentina's Foreign Minister Felipe Sola announced.

Advertising

Read more

Morales "has just landed at Ezeiza (airport). He's coming to stay in Argentina as an asylum seeker and will then have refugee status," Sola told TN television.

The new Argentine minister said Morales "feels more comfortable here than in Mexico," which initially offered him asylum when he fled Bolivia last month.

Morales fled Bolivia after nearly 14 years in power, having lost the support of the military amid weeks of violence that followed what international monitors said were deeply flawed elections.

Morales, Bolivia's first indigenous president, claims he was overthrown in a right-wing coup, and while in Mexico has kept up a daily campaign in interviews and on Twitter against the interim right-wing government.

Bolivia's Foreign Minister Karen Longaric warned Argentina that the former president would have to comply with the rules of asylum and not interfere in Bolivia's politics.

Whether as an asylum seeker or refugee, Longaric said the former president should not be allowed to carry out public political activity as he did in Mexico.

US Senate passes resolution recognising Armenian genocide, infuriating Turkey

0

Issued on: Modified:

The U.S. Senate on Thursday unanimously passed a resolution that recognizes as a genocide the mass killings of Armenians a century ago, a move that infuriated Turkey and further strained ties between Ankara and Washington.

Advertising

Read more

Turkey condemned the measure, saying it will not help improve relations with the United States. The two NATO allies are already at loggerheads over several issues, including Ankaras purchase of Russian missile defense systems and policy over Syria.

The Democratic-led House of Representatives passed the resolution by an overwhelming majority in October. But a vote in the Senate was repeatedly blocked by President Donald Trumps fellow Republican senators.

“By passing my Armenian Genocide resolution, the Senate finally stood up to confirm history,” said Democratic senator Bob Menendez, who was one of the co-authors of the legislation.

The resolution asserts that it is U.S. policy to commemorate as genocide the killing of 1.5 million Armenians by the Ottoman Empire from 1915 to 1923. The Ottoman Empire was centered in present-day Turkey.

Turkey accepts that many Armenians living in the Ottoman Empire were killed in clashes with Ottoman forces during World War One, but contests the figures and denies that the killings were systematically orchestrated and constitute a genocide.

“In every previous attempt to politicize history by some members of the US Congress, we reiterated our position to form a group to study it,” Fahrettin Altun, Turkeys communications director said on Twitter in response to the resolution.

US Senate passes resolution recognising Armenian genocide, infuriating Turkey

0

Issued on: Modified:

The U.S. Senate on Thursday unanimously passed a resolution that recognizes as a genocide the mass killings of Armenians a century ago, a move that infuriated Turkey and further strained ties between Ankara and Washington.

Advertising

Read more

Turkey condemned the measure, saying it will not help improve relations with the United States. The two NATO allies are already at loggerheads over several issues, including Ankaras purchase of Russian missile defense systems and policy over Syria.

The Democratic-led House of Representatives passed the resolution by an overwhelming majority in October. But a vote in the Senate was repeatedly blocked by President Donald Trumps fellow Republican senators.

“By passing my Armenian Genocide resolution, the Senate finally stood up to confirm history,” said Democratic senator Bob Menendez, who was one of the co-authors of the legislation.

The resolution asserts that it is U.S. policy to commemorate as genocide the killing of 1.5 million Armenians by the Ottoman Empire from 1915 to 1923. The Ottoman Empire was centered in present-day Turkey.

Turkey accepts that many Armenians living in the Ottoman Empire were killed in clashes with Ottoman forces during World War One, but contests the figures and denies that the killings were systematically orchestrated and constitute a genocide.

“In every previous attempt to politicize history by some members of the US Congress, we reiterated our position to form a group to study it,” Fahrettin Altun, Turkeys communications director said on Twitter in response to the resolution.

Bolivias former president Morales arrives in Argentina to seek asylum

0

Issued on: Modified:

Bolivia's exiled ex-president Evo Morales arrived in Buenos Aires on Thursday where he is to seek political asylum, Argentina's Foreign Minister Felipe Sola announced.

Advertising

Read more

Morales "has just landed at Ezeiza (airport). He's coming to stay in Argentina as an asylum seeker and will then have refugee status," Sola told TN television.

The new Argentine minister said Morales "feels more comfortable here than in Mexico," which initially offered him asylum when he fled Bolivia last month.

Morales fled Bolivia after nearly 14 years in power, having lost the support of the military amid weeks of violence that followed what international monitors said were deeply flawed elections.

Morales, Bolivia's first indigenous president, claims he was overthrown in a right-wing coup, and while in Mexico has kept up a daily campaign in interviews and on Twitter against the interim right-wing government.

Bolivia's Foreign Minister Karen Longaric warned Argentina that the former president would have to comply with the rules of asylum and not interfere in Bolivia's politics.

Whether as an asylum seeker or refugee, Longaric said the former president should not be allowed to carry out public political activity as he did in Mexico.

US sees higher maternal mortality among African American women

0

Issued on: Modified:

The rate of mothers dying in childbirth is dropping around the world – almost everywhere, it seems, except the United States. The maternal mortality rate there is actually rising and has more than doubled in the past twenty years. Over 700 American women die each year from complications related to pregnancy and there are massive disparities along racial lines. Black women are three to four times more likely to die in childbirth than white women. Our correspondent Jessica Le Masurier reports from New York.

Advertising

Also, this week in Washington, House Democrats announced two articles of impeachment against Donald Trump, accusing the president of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. They say Trump presents a clear and present danger to both US national security and next year's presidential election. We tell you what those charges are and how they fit into the impeachment inquiry against the president.

Finally, in today's hair-trigger social media landscape, authors and publishers are taking special precautions to identify potential pitfalls to beiRead More – Source

Trump becoming ‘dictator’, warn US Democrats on fiery first day of impeachment debate

0

Issued on: Modified:

Democrats warned that US President Donald Trump was on the verge of dictatorship while Republicans fiercely defended his record at the opening of a stormy, historic debate on impeachment charges Wednesday.

Advertising

Read more

The parties held tightly to diametrically opposed views of Trump as they weighed articles of impeachment at the beginning of a two-day debate.

Trump is alleged to have wielded the power of the presidency for personal and political gain by pressuring Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 US election.

There is little question about the outcome in the House Judiciary Committee: by the end of the week the majority-Democrat panel is expected to approve the charges and send them to the entire House of Representatives for passage next week.

But lawmakers in the televised hearing appeared focused on speaking to voters, whose sentiment will be crucial if, as expected, Trump goes on trial in the US Senate in January.

In a grave voice, Democratic committee chairman Jerry Nadler opened the hearing.

"Today we begin consideration of two articles of impeachment against President Donald J. Trump," he said.

Popular Posts

My Favorites