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Trump retweets anti-Muslim videos

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The videos, posted by Jayda Fransen, the deputy leader of Britain First, a far-right and ultra-nationalist political group, depict purported Muslims assaulting people and, in one video, smashing a statue of the Virgin Mary.Trump, who has previously warned that immigration from Muslim-majority nations threatens European and US security, frequently retweets other messages whose political views he finds favorable. But he has seldom shared messages as offensive and explosive as he did on Wednesday, and the retweets were immediately met with outrage in the United Kingdom and resulted in a rare rebuke from the British government toward its American ally.Fransen reacted jubilantly online, touting that the videos had been shared with Trump's nearly 44 million followers. "GOD BLESS YOU TRUMP!" she wrote in all caps. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders defended Trump's retweets, telling reporters that he shared them to start a conversation about border security and immigration."I think his goal is to promote strong borders and strong national security," Sanders told a small group of reporters after appearing on Fox News.Sanders also downplayed questions about whether the videos were authentic, because "the threat is real.""That is what the President is talking about, that is what the President is focused on, is dealing with those real threats, and those are real no matter how you look at it," she said.One of the videos purports to show a young "Muslim migrant" attacking a boy on crutches. The Dutch attorney general's office, which handled the case, said the incident occurred in May and the suspect was born and raised in the Netherlands. A spokesperson would not comment on the suspect's religion, saying it was against their policy to share such information.Sanders said she didn't know how Trump came across the videos, but conservative commentator Ann Coulter, who is one of the 45 accounts Trump follows, had retweeted Tuesday one of the clips shared by Fransen.Fransen was found guilty of religiously aggravated harassment in November 2016 after abusing a Muslim woman wearing a hijab while she was with her four children. She was fined by the court and ordered to pay costs. In a separate development, Fransen was also charged over using "threatening, abusive or insulting words or behavior" during a speech she made in Belfast in Northern Ireland. She is set to appear at Belfast Magistrates Court on December 14.

Outrage in UK

Trump's retweets were leading several major British news websites Wednesday morning, and officials condemned him on Twitter. A spokesperson for UK Prime Minister Theresa May said Trump was "wrong" to share the videos, adding that "Britain First seeks to divide communities through their use of hateful narratives which peddle lies and stoke tensions.""British people overwhelmingly reject the prejudiced rhetoric of the far-right, which is the antithesis of the values that this country represents — decency, tolerance and respect," added the spokesperson, who also said Trump's upcoming 2018 state visit for now remains on.A senior member of May's Conservative government, Communities secretary Sajid Javid also tweeted about the issue, writing: "So POTUS has endorsed the views of a vile, hate-filled racist organisation that hates me and people like me. He is wrong and I refuse to let it go and say nothing."The Muslim Council of Britain slammed Trump in a statement, saying the retweets were "the clearest endorsement yet from the US President of the far-right and their vile anti-Muslim propaganda. The US-based Council on American-Islamic Relations similarly condemned Trump's retweets, saying he is "clearly telling members of his base that they should hate Islam and Muslims."Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the UK opposition Labour Party, called the retweets "abhorrent, dangerous and a threat to our society." Labour lawmaker David Lammy told the President he was "not welcome in my country and my city."Brendan Cox, the husband of Jo Cox, the British MP who was murdered last year by a man who reportedly shouted "Britain First" as he attacked her, tweeted, "Trump has legitimized the far right in his own country, now he's trying to do it in ours. Spreading hatred has consequences & the President should be ashamed of himself."Asked about Trump's retweets on CNN's "New Day," former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said he found them "bizarre and disturbing.""I think it causes friends and allies to question where is he coming from with this. So it has all kinds of ripple effects both in terms of perhaps inciting or encouraging anti-Muslim violence, and as well, causes, I think, our friends and allies to wonder about the judgment of the President of the United States," he said.One person who applauded Trump's Twitter actions: former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke, who tweeted, "Thank God for Trump! That's why we love him!"

Trump's call for travel ban

Trump has repeatedly used examples of terrorism and immigration in Europe to bolster his case for a travel ban in the United States against several Muslim-majority nations. The travel ban would not affect travel from the United Kingdom. On September 15, the President reacted on Twitter to a terrorist attack in London, calling the terrorists "sick and demented people," ending the tweet by declaring, "Must be proactive!"He also added to his tweet that he would like to see a stronger travel ban: "The travel ban into the United States should be far larger, tougher and more specific-but stupidly, that would not be politically correct!"Cillizza: Donald Trump's assault on truth circles back to birtherismSeveral versions of Trump's travel ban have been tied up in court battles. The Supreme Court is currently considering whether to allow all of the third version of the ban to go into effect pending appeal. Trump's previous comments about Muslims have been cited in court rulings blocking previous versions of the ban, and it's possible his retweets on Wednesday could be cited in the future.As a candidate, Trump called for a "total and complete shutdown" of Muslims entering the US and often cited Muslim migration to Europe as his justification, tweeting in December 2015 that the UK was "trying hard to disguise their massive Muslim problem."The President has also been critical of German Chancellor Angela Merkel in the past for her handling of immigration into Germany. "What's happening in Germany, I always thought Merkel was like this great leader. What she's done in Germany is insane. It is insane. They're having all sorts of attacks," Trump said in an October 2015 interview.

CNN's Tom Lumley, Maegan Vazquez, Ariane de Vogue, Dan Merica, Donie O'Sullivan, Eliza Mackintosh and Vasco Cotovio contributed to this report.

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UK Supreme Court dismisses Northern Ireland abortion law case

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The Supreme Court said it had no jurisdiction to consider the challenge brought by the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC) because the proceedings did not involve an identified victim. But a narrow majority of the seven-strong panel of justices were of "clear opinion" that the current legislation is "incompatible" with Article 8 of the European Convention of Human Rights in cases of fatal fetal abnormality, rape and incest, but not serious fetal abnormality. The Deputy President of the Supreme Court, Lord Jonathan Hugh Mance, said that "the present law clearly needs radical reconsideration." NIHRC told the court in October that the current law criminalizes women and girls, subjecting them to "inhuman and degrading" treatment. It had asked the court to rule on whether it was unlawful to prohibit abortions that arise from sexual crimes or cases involving "a serious fetal abnormality."After the Irish republic's overwhelming abortion referendum result in late May, Northern Ireland is now the only area of the British Isles where termination is only permitted if there is a risk to the woman's life or if there are long-term or permanent threats to a woman's mental or physical health. The republic's constitutional reform had spurred questions over whether there should be a similar change to the law in Northern Ireland.Decisions on abortion law are the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Assembly, but it has been suspended for more than a year because of a political impasse. But despite the hiatus, the UK government has said it will not intervene on the issue. The minority government of British Prime Minister Theresa May relies for its survival in the UK parliament on support from the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), a deeply conservative party from Northern Ireland that opposes any attempt to ease restrictions on abortion.DUP leader Arlene Foster said last week that the referendum in the republic had "no impact upon the law in Northern Ireland."

Pressure falls on UK PM

Shortly after the ruling, NIHRC Chief Commissioner Les Allamby said in a statement: "The highest court in the UK has today agreed with the Commission that Northern Ireland's laws on termination of pregnancy are incompatible with human rights."Allamby said that Thursday's proceedings made it clear that Northern Ireland needs to reform its termination laws and called on the UK government to intervene."The law now needs to change to stop women and girls from further anxiety and suffering. In the absence of the NI Executive and Assembly it falls to the UK government to make this change and it must act without delay," he added. More than 160 lawmakers, including some Conservatives, have written to May demanding she allow a referendum on relaxing the abortion laws in Northern Ireland. The UK's Royal College of Midwives has also said it supports such a move.

CNN's Simon Cullen and Hilary Clarke contributed to this report.

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It claims that the deal is likely to be ‘against the public interest’

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Murdoch-Trump and the Disney-Fox deal

A U.K. regulator is recommending that the government block Rupert Murdoch's planned $16 billion takeover of Sky TV in its current form.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said in a statement Tuesday that the proposed deal by Murdoch's 21st Century Fox(FOX) is likely to be "against the public interest" because it would give the mogul too much control over British media.

"Media plurality goes to the heart of our democratic process. It is very important that no group or individual should have too much control of our news media or too much power to affect the political agenda," said Anne Lambert, chair of the regulator's investigations group.

The CMA's recommendation is provisional. Its final report will be submitted to U.K. Culture Secretary Matt Hancock by May 1. He will then have to decide whether to block Murdoch.

If he does, Disney(DIS) — which is buying most of 21st Century Fox — would end up owning Fox's existing 39% stake in Sky. Disney would then have to decide whether to make its own offer for the remaining 61%.

The CMA proposed steps 21st Century Fox could take to address its concerns, including spinning off Sky News.

The British government asked the regulator in September to examine the Sky takeover because of concerns that the deal would concentrate too much power in the hands of the Murdoch family.

Murdoch already owns three of Britain's biggest newspapers: The Sun, The Times and The Sunday Times.

Related: Disney is buying itself a messy TV deal in Europe

21st Century Fox said in a statement Tuesday that it was "disappointed" by the CMA's provisional findings and would continue to engage with the regulator.

Japan and EU sign massive trade deal

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How to negotiate a trade deal

The European Union and Japan signed a huge free trade deal on Tuesday that cuts or eliminates tariffs on nearly all goods.

The agreement covers 600 million people and almost a third of the global economy. It's also a major endorsement of a global trading system that is under increasing threat from protectionism.

It will remove tariffs on European exports such as cheese and wine. Japanese automakers and electronics firms will face fewer barriers in the European Union.

The dismantling of trade barriers stands in stark contrast to the approach taken by President Donald Trump, who has imposed tariffs on a range of foreign goods and is threatening more action.

Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, hailed the agreement as the "largest bilateral trade deal ever."

"Relations between the European Union and Japan have never been stronger," he said in a written statement. "Geographically, we are far apart. But politically and economically we could hardly be any closer."

Japan and the European Union traded roughly €129 billion ($152 billion) of goods last year, according to EU data.

Related: Trump missed his chance to cut Canada's dairy tariffs

With the largest bilateral trade deal EVER, today we cement Japanese-European friendship. Geographically, we are far apart. But politically and economically we could hardly be any closer. With shared values of liberal democracy, human rights and the rule of law. pic.twitter.com/ICcGTY3XI8

— Donald Tusk (@eucopresident) July 17, 2018

Baker McKenzie partner Ross Denton said the deal signed Tuesday sends "a very strong signal to the US Administration that the EU and Japan, two major trade partners of the US, both see the benefits of removing barriers and reducing, not increasing tariffs."

EU trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström said last month that Europe was willing to lower some of its tariffs and cooperate with the United States. But the Trump administration "closed the door" on the talks and subsequently slapped tariffs on EU steel and aluminum.New American tariffs on European cars could follow soon.

Trump also pulled the United States out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership at the start of his presidency, another trade deal that lowered tariffs and trade barriers for the 11 remaining signatories.

japan eu handshake
Japan and the European Union signed a new free trade deal on Tuesday.

Average global tariffs are near record lows. EU products currently face an average tariff of 1.6% when they arrive in Japan, while Japanese products face tariffs of 2.9% in the European Union, according to the World Trade Organization.

Still, the European Union said the tariffs cost its companies up to €1 billion ($1.2 billion) per year.

The trade deal is expected to come into force in 2019 after being approved by lawmakers on both sides.

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Russians win gold — then sing national anthem

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That was in violation of the strict neutrality rules the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had set out for the OAR team, which was made up of more than 160 Russian athletes who were able to prove they hadn't been doping after their country was banned from PyeongChang 2018 because of alleged state-sponsored doping before and during the 2014 Sochi Olympics. "I think from the beginning we had this inkling inside each one of us and then, as we lined up, we said we will sing the anthem and that's it," Bogdan Kiselevich told reporters after the OAR's 4-3 overtime win. *We're prohibited from having the flag so we had to do something at least. We sang because we're Russian people and when you win, the anthem is played. It was in our souls and heart."Questioned whether he was afraid the team would be punished for singing the anthem, Kiselevich responded: "It's freedom of speech."The OAR team's Nikita Gusev had scored in the final minute of regulation to force overtime. Kirill Kaprizov then scored the gold-medal-clinching goal to hand the team its 17th medal, but only its second gold medal of the Games. The last time Russia won's men's Olympic ice hockey gold was back in 1992 when it competed as the Unified Team following the break up of the Soviet Union.A few hours before the ice hockey finals, the IOC had decided not to let the OAR athletes march into the Olympic stadium later for Sunday's Closing Ceremony under the Russian flag and in their national colors.After the OAR team's ice hockey win, US slopestyle skier Gus Kenworthy tweeted: "Russia's biggest win since the 2016 US Presidential election."The German ice hockey team in action during the gold medal match.  READ: U.S. women's hockey: From fighting for better pay to fighting for goldREAD: Russian athletes banned from marching behind flag

Germany silver, Canada bronze

Germany, the 60-1 outsiders, had pulled off one of the biggest upsets in Olympic history when it knocked out nine-time Olympic champions Canada in the semifinals, but there was no fairytale ending.Despite Sunday's defeat, Germany's 2018 silver medal ended a 42-year medal drought in men's ice hockey. No German team had reached the Olympic podium since West Germany claimed bronze at the Innsbruck Games in 1976.Canada, which had won three gold medals in the past four Olympics, defeated the Czech Republic on Saturday to take bronze.

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A response to Nick Cave- Silencing of whose voice?

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Nick Cave is preparing to play the second of two concerts in Israel. Justifying his decision to perform despite the cultural boycott of Israel, Cave framed his act as a statement against “the silencing of artists.”

A few miles away from Cave’s press conference celebrating his concerts, Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour remains under house arrest. Tatour, a Palestinian citizen of Israel, was arrested in 2015 for posting a poem online. Numerous civil liberty organisations including PEN International, have campaigned for her release. 300 writers, including 11 Pulitzer Prize winners, signed a 2016 letter condemning the attempt to silence her voice. Tatour has announced that if she is released from detention she will leave Israel as she cannot be truly free under its apartheid regime.

“I don’t think they will leave me alone…I cannot live without poetry. They will examine everything I write. Therefore, I will do what every poet who wants to be free does: leave. I will look for my life elsewhere. It is very hard for me to say this, but it comes after much thought. They want me to stop writing. For me to be a poet without a pen and without feelings. But if I cannot mourn for my compatriots who are being killed, how will I be able to be a poet?”

Her lawyer, Abed Fahoum, told the press “I believe that they aim to use her to intimidate and silence all Palestinians.”

Dareen Tatour’s case is a prominent example of Israel’s systematic suppression of Palestinian culture, art and freedom of political expression. In recent years, these have included the banning of public readings of Palestinian poetry , closing down of plays as well as the detention of artists. The writer Ahmad Qatamesh, who has been declared a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International, has been jailed in eight of the last 25 years.

But it is not the silencing of voices like Tatour, and Qatemeh, nor of any Palestinian suffering under Israeli oppression, that Nick Cave has chosen to protest. It is the threats he perceives to his own freedom of expression that concern him. As for the nature of those threats, they emerge it seems from his being asked to sign petitions and from fans and other artists asking him to make a moral choice not to perform in Israel until it ends its systematic violations of Palestinian human rights.
Nick Cave will play his concert tonight and like Radiohead before him will doubtless be celebrated by the Israeli authorities for his decision. Israeli diplomats worldwide celebrated Radiohead’s decision to play a concert in Tel Aviv earlier this year and the Jerusalem Post described their decision as “the best hasbara [advocacy] Israel has received lately”.

As Cave plays and celebrates his “artistic freedom” Dareen Tatour, entering the 769th day of her detention, will continue to receive support from the artists of conscience around the world who know the real meaning of artistic integrity and courage.

As the writer and civil rights activist James Baldwin said, “There is such a thing as integrity. Some people are noble. There is such a thing as courage. The terrible thing is that the reality behind these words depends ultimately on what the human being (meaning every single one of us) believes to be real. The terrible thing is that the reality behind all these words depends on choices one has got to make, for ever and ever and ever, every day.”

Ben Jamal, Director- Palestine Solidarity Campaign

The post A response to Nick Cave- Silencing of whose voice? appeared first on News Wire Now.

Russian opposition leader had called for rallies on ‘rigged elections’

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Navalny wrote that he was released until a court hearing, but did not provide details on when the hearing would be held. He also thanked demonstrators who had gathered near the detention center where he was being held. Navalny, a longtime critic of President Vladimir Putin, was arrested earlier Sunday during nationwide rallies protesting what the opposition leader calls rigged presidential elections set to take place on March 18. "I've been detained. This doesn't matter. Come to Tverskaya (Street). You are not going there for me, it's for you and your future," Navalny tweeted after his arrest.Within minutes of arriving at Pushkinskaya Square, where hundreds of protesters had gathered, Navalny was wrestled into a patrol van by police, in dramatic footage posted on Youtube.Moscow Police said Navalny was taken to a police station for arraignment on charges of illegally organizing a protest. If found guilty, he faces 30 days in detention and a fine. Hundreds of demonstrators fill Pushkinskaya Square in central Moscow.Coordinating protests in the largest country in the world by land mass is no small task, and the Russian Interior Ministry said events coordinated with local authorities were held in 46 places.Demonstrations have ranged from gatherings of a few dozen in remote areas to about a thousand people in central Moscow–which the Interior Ministry described as an "uncoordinated mass demonstration." Protesters also turned out in arctic areas of the country, where the temperature during winter is around -40 degrees, said CNN's Fred Pleitgen in Moscow.Elsewhere, there were 600 demonstrators in Russia's third-most populous city, Novosibirsk, and 550 protesters in Nizhny Novgorod in western Russia, the ministry said.Around 1,000 protesters gathered in the Moscow area Sunday, police said."I am proud of all those who joined us today in any capacity: from Magadan to Sochi. From the FBK office to the headquarters in Kemerovo. From Krasnodar to Yakutsk, where the meeting took place at -40. These are real citizens," Navalny said in a Facebook post."Be real citizens. Go out to the demo in your city."

Police interrupt broadcast

Earlier Navalny said police forced their way into his Moscow office hours before the protests were due to take place. A Russian police officer stands outside Alexei Navalny's Moscow office on Sunday.He said police sawed through the door of the office's studio during a YouTube broadcast Sunday morning."In order to take down our broadcast, the police cut out the door to the Anti-Corruption Foundation (FBK) office, and then began to saw the door to the studio right in the middle of broadcast," he said in a Facebook post."Do you know the formal reason? Dmitry Nizovtsev, the host, was accused of planting a bomb (without actually going off air, we must assume), and it was necessary to cut the doors ASAP in order to find this bomb."And then they detained him. Watch it, it's a good example of what the Russian police has become."CNN contacted the Moscow police, but officials there said they "have no information regarding the raids."Service members gather at Triumfalnaya Square ahead of an opposition rally calling for a boycott of March 18 presidential elections.Eight staff members from Navalny's Moscow offices were detained in the raid and were among 185 people arrested across the country, according to independent monitoring group OVD-Info. They included the head of Navalny's Moscow headquarters, Nikolay Lyaskin, who was grabbed by police on his way out of the office, according to Navalny press secretary Kira Yarmysh.During the raid, police also seized computers and cameras from the office, tweeted the director of Navalny's Anti-Corruption Foundation, Roman Rubanov.One protester in Moscow brandishes a placard saying: "Demand lawful election."

Navalny's weapon of choice

Putin controls and dominates Russian State TV, where there has so far been no mention of the demonstrations.Instead, Navalny and his supporters have turned to YouTube to get their message out, with over 50,000 people watching his live feed as of Sunday morning.

Who is Alexei Navalny?

Navalny, Russia's best-known opposition leader, was barred from running in the upcoming elections after a 2017 criminal conviction for embezzlement. The Russia threat is real -- and it mattersCritics say the case against the 41-year-old was politically motivated.In an exclusive interview with CNN at his Moscow headquarters last week, Navalny accused the Putin administration of being "built on corruption" and warned of growing impatience for political change. "Putin has been in power for 18 years now," he said. "People are not ready to wait another six years, then another six, then another."The Kremlin has rejected allegations of widespread, high-level corruption and has condemned Navalny as a dangerous influence whose calls for protests could plunge Russia into chaos.

CNN's Antonia Mortensen, Fred Pleitgen, Carol Jordan and Dakin Andone contributed to this report

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TV station can’t show final after censoring LGBT-themed song

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The European Broadcasting Union (EBU), which organizes the contest and distributes it to broadcasters around the world, said it had taken the action after Mango TV cut two acts in the first semifinal, broadcast on Tuesday.China's Global Times, a state-owned tabloid, said on Friday that the two acts — Ireland and Albania — fell foul of Chinese censors because they featured an LGBT theme and tattoos. In respons, the EBU barred Mango TV from broadcasting Thursday's second semifinal and the final, which involves acts from 26 countries and is this year being held in Lisbon, Portugal. "This is not in line with the EBU's values of universality and inclusivity and our proud tradition of celebrating diversity through music," a statement from the EBU said.Mango TV didn't immediately respond to a CNN request for comment. The Eurovision song contest could make you happier, new study suggestsThe Irish entry, Together, sung by Ryan O'Shaughnessy, is a love song about a relationship between two men and features two male dancers, while Albania's act involved performers with tattoos."A rainbow flag in the crowd, which represents the LGBT community, was also been blurred in the broadcast," the Global Times said.Guidelines released in China in 2016 characterized homosexuality as an "abnormal sexual behavior" unfit for Chinese television, alongside incest, sexual abuse and "perversion." O'Shaughnessy told the BBC he welcomed the decision. "From the very start we've just said love is love, doesn't matter if it's between two guys, two girls, or a guy and a girl," he said.Ireland, which holds the record for Eurovision wins but whose fortunes have waned in recent years, qualified for Saturday's grand final, as did Albania.

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UK told to pull more diplomats from Russia

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Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova told CNN on Saturday that the number was calculated to ensure the two nations achieve parity in how many staff members they have working at their diplomatic missions. Moscow initially expelled 23 British diplomats after 23 Russian diplomats were told to leave the UK.Russia is now insisting that more leave so the staff will be the same size in the countries' respective embassies.More than 25 countries announced this week that they would expel Russian diplomats in support of Britain, which blames Moscow for the March 4 nerve agent attack against Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the southern English city of Salisbury. Russia denies involvement.Also Saturday, Russia's Ministry of Transport said it planned to ask the UK why authorities searched a Moscow-bound Aeroflot plane Friday at London's Heathrow Airport. On its website, the ministry said, "In the absence of an explanation, the Russian side will regard these actions against our aircraft as illegal, and also reserves the possibility of similar actions against British air carriers."The UK Security Minister said the search was "routine.""It is routine for Border Force to search aircraft to protect the UK from (organized) crime and from those who attempt to bring harmful substances like drugs or firearms into the country," spokesman Ben Wallace said in a statement to CNN. "Once these checks were carried out the plane was allowed to carry on with its onward journey."The UK is also considering Russia's request for consular access to Yulia Skripal, whose condition has improved since being poisoned by the Novichok nerve agent in Salisbury."We are considering requests for consular access in line with our obligations under international and domestic law, including the rights and wishes of Yulia Skripal," a spokeswoman for the UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office said Saturday.On Friday, the Russian Embassy in London tweeted, "Good news as Yulia Skripal is reported as recovering well. We insist on the right to see her, in accordance with the 1968 Consular Convention."

CNN's Emma Burrows reported from Moscow, and Hilary Clarke wrote in London. CNN's Matthew Chance and Lauren Kent contributed to this report.

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Massive sinkhole prompts evacuation of 22 families in Rome

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The incident took place on Wednesday in via Livio Andronico, in Rome's Balduina district, just before 6 p.m. local time, according to Italian firefighters who were called to the scene. "The road had sunk for about 10 meters, dragging parked vehicles with it," firefighters said in a statement. About 22 families were evacuated from the surrounding buildings. No injuries have been reported. As of Thursday morning, firefighters were still carrying out security and stability checks on the scene with help of technicians. The sinkhole appeared near a building site where construction workers are erecting residential buildings, according to public broadcaster RAI News. Workers remove cars that were sucked down into the sinkhole.Some of the residents said they had complained to authorities about cracks in the roads. Lawyer Giancarlo De Capraris told La Repubblica newspaper: "In the last three months I filed a complaint to Carabinieri (national police) and firefighters. Everything remained unheeded. I flagged the cracks on the road surface that became deeper every day and the continuous passage of heavy vehicles. This was a disaster waiting to happen."One resident told RAI News she felt the floor of the house shaking in the past few days. Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi told Italian news agency ANSA: "Those responsible will pay."

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