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Privacy law in the United States is governed by various federal and state laws. At the federal level, the primary privacy law is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996, which regulates the protection of health data. Other federal laws addressing privacy include the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) of 1998 and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) of 1986.

At the state level, there are also different privacy laws that vary from state to state. For example, California has the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) of 2018, which gives consumers in the state the right to know what information is collected about them and how it is used, as well as the right to request deletion of that information.

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 is the primary federal privacy law in the United States. It focuses on protecting health data, setting standards for the collection, use and disclosure of sensitive medical information. For example, healthcare organizations must implement security measures to protect patient data and must obtain patient consent before sharing their medical information with third parties.

Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act

The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) of 1998 focuses on protecting children’s data. It applies to websites and applications that collect information from children under the age of 13 and requires those sites and applications to obtain parental consent before collecting, using or disclosing children’s personal information.

Electronic Communications Privacy Act

The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) of 1986 focuses on protecting the privacy of electronic communications, such as email and text messages. For example, it prohibits authorities from intercepting electronic communications without a warrant.

California Consumer Privacy Act

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) of 2018 focuses on protecting consumer data in California. It gives the state’s consumers the right to know what information is being collected about them and how it is being used, as well as the right to request deletion of that information.

In general, privacy laws in the United States focus on protecting personal information, such as name, address, and contact information, as well as sensitive information, such as health and financial information. However, US privacy laws may be less stringent than in other countries, such as the European Union, which introduced the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2018.

This article is originally published on matricedigitale.it